A conversation with Claire Guinier, Q2 2022 immunoSEQ® Young Investigator Award winner

claire-guinier

Claire Guinier, MD, MSc

Massachusetts General Hospital, Cellular and Molecular Immunology Laboratory, Center for Transplantation Sciences (CTS)​

Research Summary: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is the leading cause of mortality following heart transplantation. We will test the hypothesis that this pathology is caused by selected T cell clones expanding in the heart transplant. Our project aims to understand the immune mechanisms underlying this pathology by identifying the T cells clones, via TCR sequencing, inducing chronic rejection after cardiac transplantation in mice. This knowledge will be instrumental for the design of novel immune-based therapies to prevent or cure CAV in heart-transplanted patients.

As a part of our commitment to identify new talent to help foster growth in the immunosequencing field, our quarterly immunoSEQ® Young Investigator Award (YIA) recognizes one or more talented post-doctoral fellows and pre-doctoral students pursuing research in immunology. Winners receive a grant of up to $10,000 towards the purchase of Adaptive’s immunosequencing services to assist in their research.

We recently spoke with Claire Guinier, plastic surgery resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, Cellular and Molecular Immunology Laboratory Center for Transplantation Sciences (CTS), about her research into the role of T cells in cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), the leading cause of mortality following heart transplantation.

Adaptive Biotechnologies: How will this grant enhance your current research project?

Claire Guinier: This grant will allow us to sequence much more samples! It will allow us to investigate not only the T-cell receptor repertoire of CAV in mice, but also to compare them with two other control groups: an acute rejection group and native mice.

Adaptive: What impact do you see your research having on the field at large and what do you hope to achieve over the course of your career?

Claire: Having a deep interest in research and having the opportunity to collaborate with a multidisciplinary research team enriches my daily work as a clinician. Over the course of my career, I hope to develop meticulous methods and to undertake continuous discovery by experimenting with new ideas that can benefit my patients, whether it be in my surgical practice or in the research field.

Adaptive: What do you hope to achieve over the course of your career?

Claire: Having a deep interest in research and having the opportunity to collaborate with a multidisciplinary research team enriches my daily work as a clinician. Over the course of my career, I hope to develop meticulous methods and to undertake continuous discovery by experimenting with new ideas that can benefit my patients, whether it be in my surgical practice or in the research field.

Adaptive: What impact do you see your research having on the field at large?

Claire: To this day little is understood of the immunological mechanisms underlying chronic rejection in heart transplants. To this end, I would love for my research to help gain a better understanding of this highly complex mechanism impacting so many patients. The knowledge gained from this research would aid in the development of novel immune-based therapies to prevent or cure chronic allograft vasculopathy in heart transplant patients.

Adaptive: What advice do you have for young scientists pursuing careers in science as they begin their careers and/or research journeys?

Claire: Be curious: read, attend presentations and meetings about other researchers’ work, and exchange thoughts and ideas with them. You don’t have to limit yourself to a field that you’re already very familiar with, surround yourself with passionate and hardworking people and don’t be afraid to pursue your ideas. 

“I would like to thank Adaptive Biotechnologies for this grant and the unique opportunities that they provide to women in science and/or young researchers.”

Claire Guinier

To learn more about the WISE Award or if you have a project that could benefit from the insights that immunosequencing provides, visit www.immunoseq.com/awards/wise/